Creamery Named “travel gem” by Travel Writers

Wednesday, November 21, 2007

Zionsville, IN – November 19, 2007 – Traders Point Creamery (www.traderspointcreamery.com), a family-owned, organic dairy farm and artisan creamery, has received the Midwest Travel Writers Association’s GEMmy Award, for true “travel gems”; unique destinations that offer an exceptional experience. Barbara E. Cohen and Peggy Sailors of the MTWA presented the award on November 13 to Jane Elder Kunz and Dr. Peter F. Kunz, Creamery owners.
“We’ve all worked hard to give visitors a true sense of dairy life, as well as the experience of delicious, fresh, organic foods,” said Jane Kunz. “People are usually surprised to find such wide open pastures and natural beauty just 15 minutes from downtown Indianapolis.”
Traders Point Creamery, located at 9101 Moore Road in Zionsville, is a working dairy farm with an on-site creamery production facility. Inside the 19th-century hand-hewn barn visitors can watch the production of award-winning yogurts and cheeses; enjoy a seasonal, organic lunch or dinner in the Creamery Cafe; savor fresh ice cream creations at the Dairy Bar; shop in the farm store; and visit the milking parlor to see the cows being milked daily around 4:00pm. Outside, visitors are welcome to tour the scenic farm, picnic on the deck, walk amongst free-range chickens, enjoy the view, and with luck, see the newborn calves in the Red Barn. The Creamery also hosts a year-round Farmers Market, featuring the seasons best from local small-scale growers and artisans.
About the Midwest Travel Writers Association (MTWA) Founded in 1951, MTWA is the oldest association of professional travel writers in the United States. The organization includes travel writers and public relations professionals who live in one of the 13 Midwestern states and specialize in the travel industry. The writers are published in major magazines and newspapers nationwide and have written numerous travel books. More information about MTWA, along with travel tips of interest to midwestern travelers, can be found at http://www.mtwa.org.
About Traders Point Creamery
Traders Point Creamery is a family owned artisan dairy located in Zionsville, Indiana. The company produces handcrafted cheeses including Fromage Blanc, Fromage Blanc spicy, Fromage Blanc garden herb, old-style cottage cheese, and “Fleur de la Terre,” a natural-rind, aged cheese which won the American Cheese Society’s 2007 First Place award for Best Farmstead Cheese. Its European-style yogurts include whole milk plain (American Cheese Society’s First Place winner for 2005 and 2006), low-fat vanilla, and flavors such as Wildberry (a combination of raspberry, blackberry & acai berry), Orchard Trio (made with pear, peach, and acerola cherry), Banana-Mango, Raspberry, and other seasonal favorites. The company also produces pure, fresh, unhomogenized whole milk, chocolate milk, and ice cream. The products are sold on-site at the Creamery Farm Store and weekly Farmers Market, and through select supermarkets, gourmet shops, and natural and organic food markets throughout the U.S.
Traders Point Creamery all natural, certified organic products are made from grass-fed milk, contain no artificial ingredients, coloring, flavors, preservatives or stabilizers, and all yogurts are made with live, active cultures which offer probiotic health benefits. Since Traders Point cows are raised exclusively on pasture and eat the rich, carefully cultivated greens, their milk acquires more nutrients, including omega-3 fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs), beta-carotene and vitamins A and E, than organic milk produced using standard feeds. Established in 2003, the Creamery is housed in a restored 19th-century hand-hewn barn on a family farm, which is certified organic by the USDA. The Traders Point herd of Brown Swiss cows spends all of its time roaming free on pastures, and never receives antibiotics or synthetic growth hormones. Synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, or herbicides are never used on the land.
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About Ross Reller

I am pleased you have expressed interest in learning more about the historic Traders Point area in Indianapolis, Indiana. From 1980 to 1982 I was employed in the PR department at Conner Prairie Museum in Hamilton County. There I learned about William Conner, an important figure in Indiana's pioneer days. A decade later I became interested in the history of the Traders Point area and was surprised to learn that William Conner had been the first land owner in the area. In 1823 he acquired, through the Federal land office in Brookville, a patent for an 80 acre tract carved by Eagle Creek and an Indian trail that was about to be named the first toll roadway through the township (Lafayette Road). Thirty years later a village took shape within this tract. A grain mill on the creek, houses, churches, stores, restaurants, and two gas stations would take shape here in the creek valley hamlet of Traders Point. By 1962 all improvements (except a farmer's co-op) had been removed by the Indianapolis Flood Control Board to make way for Interstate 65 and a new reservoir. This blog is dedicated to preserving evidence of this historic area but I will occasionally use it to discuss related topics. To activate this follow, simply click the confirm button below. If you don't want to follow, ignore this message and we'll never bother you again. I am also a member of the Old Pleasant Hill Cemetery, a non profit association still selling burial plots for those who would like to spend all eternity in Traders Point, and I am an officer in the Pike Township Historical Society and the Traders Point Association of Neighborhoods.
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